Scotch Eggs from An Echo in the Bone

Scotch Eggs from An Echo in the Bone

I put down my cup and stared at him.

“You don’t mean you aren’t planning to go ho-to go back to the Ridge?”  I had a sudden empty feeling in the pit of my stomach, remembering our plans for the New House, the smell of balsam fir, and the quiet of the mountains.  Did he really mean to move to Boston or Philadelphia?

“No,” he said, surprised.  “Of course we shall go back there.  But if I mean to be in the printing trade, Sassenach, we shall need to be in a city for a time, no?  Only ’til the war is over,” he said, encouraging.

“Oh,” I said in a small voice.  “Yes. Of course.” I drank tea, not tasting it.  How could I have been so stupid?  I had never once thought that, of course, a printing press would be pointless on Fraser’s Ridge.  In part, I supposed, I simply hadn’t really believed he would get his press back, let alone thought ahead to the logical conclusion if he did.

But now he had his Bonnie back, and the future had suddenly acquired a disagreeable solidity.  Not that cities didn’t have considerable advantages, I told myself stoutly.  I could finally acquire a decent set of medical instruments, replenish my medicines — why, I could even make penicillin and ether again!  With a little better appetite, I took a Scotch egg.

Diana Gabaldon, An Echo in the Bone (Chapter 74 – Twenty-Twenty)

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Mamacita’s Sangria from Voyager

Mamacita’s Sangria from Voyager

“Have you ever drunk sangria, Mrs. Fraser?”

I opened my mouth to say “Yes,” thought better of it, and said, “No, what is it?” Sangria had been a popular drink in the 1960s, and I had had it many times at faculty parties and hospital social events.  But for now, I was sure that it was unknown in England and Scotland; Mrs. Fraser of Edinburgh would never have heard of sangria.

“A mixture of red wine and the juices of orange and lemon,” Lawrence Stern was explaining.  “Mulled with spices, and served hot or cold, depending on the weather.  A most comforting and healthful beverage, is it not, Fogden?”

Diana Gabaldon, Voyager (Chapter 50 – I Meet a Priest)

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Battlefield Blackberry Jam from The Fiery Cross

Battlefield Blackberry Jam from The Fiery Cross

Jamie and the Governor, shaken out of their nose to nose confrontation, had also retired to the shadows; I could see them, two stiff shadows, one tall and one shorter, standing close together.  The element of danger had gone out of their tête-a-tête, though; I could see Jamie’s head bent slightly toward Tryon’s shadow, listening.

“… brought food,” Phoebe Sherston was telling me, her round face pink with excited self-importance.  “Fresh bread, and butter, and some blackberry jam and cold chicken and…”

“Food!”  I said, abruptly reminded of the parcel I held under my arm.  “Do pardon me!” I gave her a quick, bright smile, and ducked away, leaving her open-mouthed in front of the tent.

Diana Gabaldon, The Fiery Cross (Chapter 72 – Tinder and Char)

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Bangers and Mash with Crock Pot Onion Gravy from DIA

Bangers and Mash with Crock Pot Onion Gravy from DIA

“Where the hell have you been?” I demanded.

He took time to kiss me before replying.  His face was cold against mine, and his lips tasted faintly and pleasantly of whisky.

“Mm, sausage for supper?” he said approvingly, sniffing at my hair, which smelled of kitchen smoke.  “Good, I’m fair starved.”

“Bangers and mash,” I said.  “Where have you been?”

He laughed, shaking out his plaid to get the blown snow off.  “Bangers and mash?  That’s food, is it?”

“Sausages with mashed potatoes,” I translated. “A nice traditional English dish, hitherto unknown in the benighted reaches of Scotland.  Now, you bloody Scot, where in hell have you been for the last two days?  Jenny and I were worried!”

Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber (Chapter 33 – Thy Brother’s Keeper)

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