Talisker Storm – The Weekend Whisky Write-up

Talisker Storm – The Weekend Whisky Write-up

“Yes,” I said, putting down a fresh cup in front of the disgruntled Lindsey. “While you’re asking after Hodgepile and Bree’s young man, would you also ask for a man named Joseph Wemyss? He’ll be a bondsman.” From the corner of my eye, I saw Lizzie’s thin shoulders slump in relief.

Duncan nodded, his composure restored as Brianna disappeared into the pantry to fetch butter. Kenny Lindsey looked after her , interested.

“Bree? Is that the name ye call your daughter?” he asked.

“Yes,” I said. “Why?”

A smile showed briefly on Lindsey’s face. Then he glanced at Jamie, coughed, and buried the smile in his cup.

“It’s a Scots word, Sassenach,” Jamie said, a rather wry smile appearing on his own face . “A bree is a great disturbance.”

Diana Gabaldon, Drums of Autumn (Chapter 43 – Whisky in the Jar)

One of Talisker Distillery’s newer offerings, Storm, is causing a disturbance of its own on the Scottish Whisky scene. Loved by some, lambasted by others, there’s no doubt that Storm stimulates the passions in her tasters…you either love it, or you don’t.

I’m on the love end of the spectrum.

Storm is complex — and may go unappreciated by your average whisky virgin.  More experienced tasters, though, may enjoy the light nose and the way it contrasts with a heavier mouth feel and a solid hit of wood smoke .  This is definitely the smokiest dram I’ve ever enjoyed from Talisker and the Isle of Skye, and I’ve taken to referring to Storm as Lagavulin-light.

If you know how I feel about Lagavulin, you’ll understand I mean this as an up-most compliment.

As for the haters, many simply don’t like that Storm is another in a growing line of “No Age Statement” (NAS) whiskies. Rather than the 10, 12 or 20 YO monikers attached to whiskies in the past, distilleries are now releasing single malts with engaging, emotional, names rather than the staid old numbers of the past that often meant nothing to anyone but the experts. The reasons for the change are many, and quite fascinating.  Read more here.

Others simply don’t think that Storm measures up to the rest of the inventory available at Talisker.  I’m mystified by that opinion, but then again, there’s rarely any accounting for taste, aye?  Nectar to some is swill to others…and never the twain shall meet.

The only way to know is to try it for yourself.

Sláinte!

 

I am a professional chef, a food writer and an unabashed fan of Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series.

9 Comments

  1. Dawna Lockhart

    Have you tried Bowmore Enigma, speaking of names not numbers? It’s smoky but sweet.

    Reply

    • Theresa

      Not yet, Dawna! But thanks for the recommendation!

      Reply

  2. Lori

    Oooooo! I’m going to have to try that one! You know how I feel about Lagavulin!

    Reply

    • Theresa

      I think you`ll love it!

      Reply

  3. DeAnna Anderson

    I love this!

    “Bree? Is that the name ye call your daughter?” he asked.

    “Yes,” I said. “Why?”

    A smile showed briefly on Lindsey’s face. Then he glanced at Jamie, coughed, and buried the smile in his cup.

    “It’s a Scots word, Sassenach,” Jamie said, a rather wry smile appearing on his own face . “A bree is a great disturbance.”

    Reply

  4. jane

    Maybe I should have named my strawberry blonde haired daughter Bree. Life is never smooth where she is!

    Reply

  5. Sunshineyness

    Talisker… my favorite…

    “If the sea were Whiskey… And if I were a duck… I’d swim ta the bottom and never come up”

    Reply

  6. deniz

    Yum! I’ve only had Talisker once. I hadn’t known about the change from age numbers to descriptive names – that’s really interesting.

    Reply

  7. Carolyn

    Apparently, I’m quite fond of Auctentoshen (sp?). Wonder if Storm will be any thing like that.

    Reply

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