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(Tattie) Potato Scones

(Tattie) Potato Scones

Beyond the Books, Outlander on Starz

Hey there! I’m back after a 2 week stint as a truant blogger, I’m happy to report I’ve got a recipe for the Fraser’s returnย  to Scotland. I’m a bit late, as Rabbie dug the first potato out of the kail yard last weekend, but you won’t hold that against me, will ye?

I hope not, especially since I’ve got warm potato, aka tattie, scones for you to munch on during episode 209, coming up this week.

potato scones
Photo Courtesy of Starz

Although not quite as easy as Fergus’s suggestion to boil them and serve them with salt, tattie scones are a simple recipe that are traditionally made from leftover potatoes, (“usually just after the midday meal, when still warm,” according to F Marian McNeill’s The Scots Kitchen).

Potato scones are not specifically mentioned in Outlander or any of the subsequent books, but they are a Scottish staple, (and an Irish one before that), that came about when the Scots adopted potatoes into their gardens in the mid and late 18th Century.

Tattie Scone

They are delicious at breakfast, spread with extra butter and served with eggs, bacon and beans. Or spread them with cream cheese, dill, and a few slices of lox or smoked salmon for a new-world brunch steeped in Scottish tradition.

And although potato scones are more of a flat bread than their flaky cousins usually served at tea, they are just as delicious with butter and jam, and also make a lovely accompaniment to a steaming bowl of soup on a cold day.Tattie Scones

(Click on the title below for a printable version of the recipe.)

(Tattie) Potato Scones

Makes three 7-inch diameter scones (12 farls)

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound Russet potatoes (or other floury potato – about 2 medium)
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • ยพ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Bacon fat, or more butter, for frying

Method:

Cut the potatoes in half and put them in a pan with about 1โ€ of salted water. Bring to a boil, cover and reduce the heat. Simmer until cooked through, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain well and return to the hot pan for a minute to steam dry. Peel off the skins as soon as you can handle them.

Mash the potatoes in a medium bowl and stir in the butter until melted. Mix in the flour and salt until well combined. Roll out one-third of the dough on a lightly floured surface to a 7-inch round about โ…œ-inch thick, turning and flipping the dough to prevent sticking. Dust lightly with flour and prick all over with a fork. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Heat 1 tablespoon bacon fat or butter on a griddle or heavy bottomed frying pan over a medium-high heat. When bubbling, add one round and fry until golden on both sides, 3 to 5 minutes. Cut into triangles and serve immediately with butter, or cool on a tea towel for later.

Notes:

  • I haven’t tried it myself, but this recipe is a perfect candidate for conversion to gluten free. A number of alternatives should work, although you may have to play with the amounts a bit. Please leave a comment if you make a successful batch!

18 Comments

  1. Anna Lapping
    May 31, 2016 at 6:21 am

    My mother made these on meatless Fridays with some cheese melted on top, usually served with a meatless minestrone, or fresh tomato soup. Very good, and we didn’t miss the meat at all.

  2. cathy
    May 31, 2016 at 7:22 am

    this sounds yummy. i have pre ordered your cook book on amazon. grew up with lots of potatoes and this recipe is different. like the lox with this one. thanks. cathy scanlon fiore.

  3. Julie
    May 31, 2016 at 7:33 am

    Friends and I enjoyed your recipe for Bangers and Mash to welcome the first potatoes to Lallybroch, but we’ll definitely give these a try too!

  4. Stephanie Lewis
    May 31, 2016 at 7:40 am

    Could you peel them before boiling? I have a great potato peel crisp recipe that I can make with them (waste not want not). ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Theresa
      May 31, 2016 at 8:19 am

      You can do whatever you want. ๐Ÿ™‚ I sometimes use the cooked skins for potato skins after I’ve scooped out the flesh.

  5. Tanya
    May 31, 2016 at 12:35 pm

    I made your bangers and mash for episode 208 and I think the leftover “mash” would do just fine here. ๐Ÿ™‚

  6. Christine Rogers
    May 31, 2016 at 12:39 pm

    These work just fine with Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten free flour in the same amount called for in the recipe ๐Ÿ’œ

    • Cindy James
      June 1, 2016 at 4:13 pm

      Thanks, Christine! I wondered what the texture would be….. ๐Ÿ™‚

  7. Jan Anderson
    May 31, 2016 at 12:59 pm

    Mmmmm, OK I’m shooting for gluten free. Going to try my staple oat flour and see what happens! I’ll test it out early before the viewing party on Saturday just in case I need to modify anything. I love that you always mention the tie in with the show . I do play a little make believe when I’m cooking the recipes, so it helps! I can see wee Rabbie running up to Mistress Claire now with an armload of tatties! ๐Ÿ˜€ x.

  8. Maryann Calvert.
    May 31, 2016 at 1:17 pm

    My mother used to make these with leftover mashed potatoes, often with a fried egg for lunch. Her mother’s family history is Irish. As a matter of fact, my mom told stories of how Grandma would read the cards for people, to earn some money during the Depression

  9. Diane
    May 31, 2016 at 4:08 pm

    Yum. I am definitely trying these. I’ll let you know how it works out. ๐Ÿ™‚

  10. Liz
    May 31, 2016 at 4:09 pm

    My mum always “fried” them dry the first time – no fat in the pan. Those were the ones we ate with butter and jam and maybe cheese lol. We could eat them forever! If there were any left that made it to the fridge, they were then fried up again in fat as a side with bacon and eggs. Both ways are delicious!

    • Liz
      May 31, 2016 at 4:11 pm

      Oops! Forgot to mention, I do love your recipes. What a great idea to go along with the series.

  11. Eva
    May 31, 2016 at 6:48 pm

    I have forgotten about this old recipe, will be making it, as it is winter here in (Tasmania). Thank you for the reminder. Love the recipes and will buy the book when it is available. <3

  12. Anne E
    May 31, 2016 at 6:53 pm

    Theresa, The photos remind me of lefse, the Norwegian potato delicacy. Ingredients seem similar, but the potatoes are riced, not mashed. I love lefse (even though I’m not a Norwegian!!) I’ll be making these soon, from YOUR recipe. Thank you.

  13. TJ Russell-Zapata
    May 31, 2016 at 10:13 pm

    Sounds alot like potato pancakes.

  14. Bea
    May 31, 2016 at 10:54 pm

    I always called them potato pancakes..lol..never used flour in them but all the rest and they are do delicious!!!

  15. Lin
    June 6, 2016 at 8:27 pm

    My mother made these for me when I was young from memory watching her mother from Kilmarnock make them (my grandmother). They are so good, and usually I don’t use leftover mashed potatoes, but start from scratch. We called them scones, of course, but had a friend whose heritage was Norwegian, and the called them potatoe latkes – although theirs were much thiner!

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